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Unread 02-21-2010, 10:12 PM
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Default The United States of Ameriwank

With Ameriwank eaten in the ASB crash a while back, I've decided to repost with some revisions as I see fit and to go along with the in-progress novel i'm slowly working on. Probably going to go at a slow pace to maximize readership (ie. suck yall in with short reading then BAM! its been a month and were on page 3! )

Anyways, here we go again and enjoy!

------------------

Chapter 1
Summer Soldier and the Cross Time Patriot

George Washington was quietly clearing some land on his estate. There was still a cold chill in the March air but winter for the most part was in its last stages, it was time to prepare for planting again and as always that started with clearing land of winter debris. Washington was working on a particularly nasty fallen branch when a flash of blue light engulfed the field. Washington, obviously startled, turned around to see a man emerge from a portal of pure light blue light.

“Are you George Washington” asked the man. There was no English accent about him, yet he didn’t have the drawl of one of the Appalachian peoples. He was also very dark skinned, almost like a lighter colored native. What stood about above all was his clothing, this man, this stranger, was dressed in a peculiar black coat. Immaculately dyed and stitched to the point that Washington doubted even the Austrian Hapsburgs or French Bourbons could have ordered it tailored. The stranger’s trousers were of the same quality. Lacking a powdered whig, the man instead had perfectly trimmed brown hair. Covering his eyes were the darkest glasses Washington had ever seen

“I am.” Said Washington nervously, clinching his ax tightly just in case.

“Listen to me Mr. Washington,” said the man frankly and calmly. “For the message I’m bringing you can save the world.”

Washington’s mind began to race. Who was this man? What magic allowed him to suddenly appear? Where was he from? Dare he even ask…when?

“I’m listening.” Said the still rattled, yet curious, Washington.

“I am a time traveler from the future; you don’t need to know the details but I’m from the year 2158. Our technology has grown much since your time Mr. Washington, but our sectarian divisions, violence, hate, and lack of honor and logic has also grown as well. In my time, the world goes to war and with our level of technology, almost everything is destroyed. Billions die, entire nations vanish in fire and smoke, it’s a world we cannot afford to let happen.”

Washington was shocked; he had been clearing brush one minute the next a man appears out of thin air with warning of an apocalypse in 400 years.

“So what does this have to do with me?” asked Washington

“You know as well as I do Mr. Washington that the colonies are on the verge of war with England. What you don’t know is that you will win this war and those colonies go on to become the greatest power the world has ever known. America has its flaws but it is a beacon of hope for humanity, an arsenal of democracy, and the epitome of man’s achievements in the name of logic and freedom. But the rest of the world hates America and in my time she’s the first to be destroyed. I’m here to give you the tools you need to turn the United States of America into the United States of Earth and prevent the world from killing itself before it even has the capability to do so.”

“Wouldn’t it be easier to go to 2157 and tell everyone what happens and prevent it?” asked Washington in protest of this life changing event.

“Probably, but that would only delay the inevitable. Trust me Mr. Washington, my people and I have thought long and hard about this, the only way to unite the world and prevent disaster is to start now and the best country to unite the world isn’t Britain or France or China or Russia, it’s the one about to be born now.”

“So we’re to unite the world starting now? You do realize that we can’t even unite the colonies against a common enemy, how do we unite the world!” asked Washington.

“Like I said, I’m bringing you the tools.” Said the stranger. He opened a bag he had with him and pulled out a gold ring with a small ruby encrusted into it. “When you press this gem everyone that hears you speak will be inclined to believe you. It’s a form of mind control that will convince people to join your side. But remember you can’t take away people free will, only influence them heavily.”

Washington took the ring and examined it. It seemed simple enough, even almost deceivingly elegant.

The man reached into his bag again and pulled out a metal plate about a foot and a half in diameter. It had some buttons and a strange screen lit up with numbers and words. “This is a replicator, by pressing these buttons you can create any element known to man. I’ve disabled some of the dangerous ones that your time wouldn’t understand just yet and have no need for but you can get all the gold, silver, lead, and iron you want from this.”

The man pressed a button on the screen, the plate lit up and suddenly a bar of gold appeared.

“Amazing” exclaimed a stunned Washington examining the gold.

“With this, money and ammunition should not be an issue,” said the man. “Its not enough to run a nation on, but it will give you and America a massive boost against your enemies.”

That last word stuck in Washington’s mind, ‘enemies’. Uniting the world, suddenly the British seemed much less intimidating in the face of the French, Russians, Prussians, Austrians, Ottomans, Chinese, and all the other nations of the world.

“And lastly,” said the man pulling a small black circle with a band attached from the bag, “Your watch.”

Washington examined the “watch” and discovered something that looked like a simple pocket watch, though it could be attached to his wrist by the leather band. The clock looked elegant like the ring, but Washington suspected something more devious.

The Stranger pressed on one of the side knobs and before Washington’s eyes an image appeared in the air over the watch face. It was like watching a living sculpture but if it were made of pure light.

“It’s what we call a hologram,” said the man. “It’s a projection of information in the third dimension. This is no mere timepiece, but a way to communicate with other watches like this, bring up information from our databases, even teleport across the globe.”

“Teleport?” asked the stunned yet puzzled Virginian.

The Stranger pressed the clock face and brought up the most complete and accurate map of the globe Washington had ever seen.

“With this map you can select any point on the Earth and transfer yourself there instantly.”

Washington took the watch and marveled at the technology. “How is this possible though?”

“Don’t worry about the technology Mr. Washington, just use it wisely, I know you’re the right man for this job and now you have the tools to unite the world.” The man smiled and disappeared in another flash leaving his bag. George looked inside; there were five more rings, eleven more watches and another replicator plate.

“Unite the World to save the World,” said Washington sarcastically. “…How hard could it be?”
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Unread 02-21-2010, 10:47 PM
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Chapter 2
A New World Order

It was the eve of the First Continental Congress, a congress that was proving to be truly Continental. George Washington had spent several days thinking things over and working with the technology the man had brought. For chores around the farm they were already making life useful, with the teleporter Washington could cross the plantation in a second and the ring had drastically cut down on arguments with Martha. But he was so indecisive on what his plan was. Only when he sat Martha down and revealed the technology and what happened did he get a clear answer, it was his responsibility to do it.

So Washington had spent the past summer traveling the North American continent using the ring to convince everyone from Canada to the Caribbean to attend. Between the ring’s effect on people’s decision making and the teleporter it had been relatively easy to.

He had also made the decision that he couldn’t do this task alone. Heck convincing Quebec to send a delegation had proven remarkably tough even with the ring, between the Quebec Act and everything going in their favor with the British they had very little reason to rebel against the Crown. And the Caribbean had been a nightmare, the people were easy to convince between the ring and plenty of gold bribes but visiting all of the islands and going through the motions had become terribly tedious. While the ring and plenty of gold managed to get most of the work done some place, like the Miskito Coast had proven quite troublesome. It took Washington several days and some rudimentry knowlege of the Miskito language before he convinced the native tribe and handful of settlers to attend the Congress. All in all, there was a reason the man had left five rings instead of just one, even fully committed George would not be able to do this one alone. So he convened a secret meeting of some of the Congresses biggest names.

So now he stood before Ben Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Sam Adams, John Adams, Patrick Henry, and Richard Henry Lee from the 13 colonies. Guy Carleton, governor of Quebec whom George had brought to the American side, and John Harper, a prominent Halifax merchant, represented Canada. And from the Caribbean were John Dalling, governor of Jamaica, and Commodore William Briggs from Grenada. The ten men along with Washington were going to comprise the Order of Freedom.

“And that’s what happened” said Washington recounting his story and showing the men the technology.

“Amazing” said Franklin playing with the replicator. “All of the sudden the pressure on us is greater than the pressure on a Baron’s Belt”.

“Yes, apparently we are to unite the world to save the world.” Said Washington

“Wouldn’t history already be changed by this though?” asked Carleton. “This time traveler you speak of altered history, the Lord only knows what 500 years from now looks like now.”

“True, but at the same time we can’t take that risk.” Said Henry. “From what George has told us this future has to be avoided, we can’t grow complacent. Besides with these technologies we have the power to unite the World under Freedom and Liberty, regardless of the future isn’t that our purpose already. The World needs us to do this anyways to save it from the cold grip of tyranny; we shouldn’t restrain ourselves because of our doubts.”

The men nodded in agreement. They had doubts and fears but there was no reason not to try, the benefits of a united world far outweighed the negatives. Convincing a room of hundreds of delegates from all over the Western Hemisphere though was going to be a little bit different. Regardless of the challenges, the Order of Freedom had been formed.
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Unread 02-21-2010, 10:48 PM
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Chapter 3
Philadelphia Prelude


So from September to October 38 delegations from all over the British Americas bickered and fought with each other over everything from Galloway’s Plan of Union (A plan that probably would have passed had it not been for Washington and John Adams using their rings together in a combined speech to shoot down the plan) to boycotts and the second Continental Congress.

However the most important issue that was the talk of the town and congress wasn’t even on the agenda. How exactly would a new nation work if created? Where would the capital be? How would the war be fought? What would happen to the Quebecoise? What of slavery? What of the Miskito, creoles, and natives? How could the Royal Navy be topped? Everything was discussed to some degree under the table. And even though the colonies had accomplished little more than a loosely organized boycott and had bickered the whole way through, it proved they could all meet together and get some things done and work together. For a congress that had started wondering if all of the 13 colonies would show up, to have everyone from Barbados to Nova Scotia show up and work together to an extent was more than anyone could imagine, even the Order of Freedom.

The winter of 1774 was a tense one to say the least. Some were still trying for peace; most has resigned their fate to war. Caches of weapons and some initial battle plans were being drawn up. Militias from Montreal to Kingston were training regularly. To many the world was on the edge of madness, but to some, like the Order of Freedom, the world was on the edge of greatness.

On April 19, 1775 a shot was heard around the world and the world took the step over the edge.
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Unread 02-22-2010, 12:10 AM
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I never got a chance to read this when you first posted it... very intriguing so far.
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Unread 02-22-2010, 03:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diamond View Post
I never got a chance to read this when you first posted it... very intriguing so far.
Thankee Diamond! A little FYI, the Revolutionary War chapters are a little weak but then get better as we get into Constitutional and Napoleonic Era. This is largely because Ameriwank is pretty much the first thing I ever wrote AH wise and you can almost see my evolution as a writer as we go.

Also I delve more into the Order of Freedom and personal story in the novel I'm working on. Hoping to be done with that around summerish.

But I'm glad your liking it thus far!
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Unread 02-22-2010, 03:34 PM
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Part 3.5
Sending a Message



Chapter I
By George R. Sanchez

The earliest inclination that the United States was to become something more than just another nation arguably occurred at the First Continental Congress in Philadelphia. The Congress itself was nothing special, simply accomplishing a list of grievances and a minor boycott but it was the message the congress sent to the world that was most important.

For many months though, the congress seemed destined to be a failure as there wouldn’t be enough delegations. The largely homogenous (economically and socially) colonies of the east coast had a hard time coming together, and Georgia almost didn’t send a delegation. Quebec had been placated by the Quebec Act and the maritime colonies of Canada would follow Quebec rather than New England, not to mention that the technology and trade routes of the day still had Bristol closer than Boston in many places, especially isolated Newfoundland. The Caribbean was completely out of the question as their ties to England were much tighter and there was the Royal Navy to worry about as well. For a long time it only seemed the King would have to fear a minor rebellion along the North American seaboard, something that would not be supported by all, would be easily crushed, and even at worst would not risk the entire empire in North America.

Then the remarkable happened, every colony and spit of British Territory in North America began to stir with rebellion and delegations from all around flocked to Philadelphia. Somehow known Patriots like the Adam’s merged with should be die hard royalists like Jamaican governor Sir John Dalling and Quebec Governor Guy Carleton to form a powerful leadership almost resigned to rebellion.

But how and why would such a radical change suddenly overcome what should have been common sense? To be honest no one really knows. The best answer lies at the individual level. An interview with Guy Carleton and Thomas Jefferson in the early 1800’s posed the two revolutionary leaders with the simple question, why?

True it made sense for many of the colonies to stay with the crown, but many of us saw an opportunity to achieve something for mankind, that’s why we advocated unity and then rebellion. Not because it made sense, but because it was the right thing to do.-Thomas Jefferson

Somehow the leaders of the colonies swayed them into unison at the First Continental Congress. Perhaps it was a revolutionary fervor for liberty? Perhaps it was an early bout of Romanticism? Perhaps George Washington's 1774 colonial tour was the key? Regardless, the previously apathetic British were shocked to see an entire continent band together against their rule, the fact that such a turn was so sudden and in many cases made little sense only added to their shock.

From then on the story of the American Revolution is well known but one other fact of the congress must be stated when discussing it. The mass and sudden unification of the colonies sent a huge message to Europe as a whole, it seemed the days of tyrannical monarchs and European hegemony was over. The First Continental Congress was much more than just a meeting of delegates, it was a mass cry from the other side of the world proclaiming that things were going to change.

Dr. George Sanchez is a professor of American History at West Florida University. He earned his Bachelors degree at Texas A&M University and then his masters at Jamaica University. He is considered to be an expert of the American Revolution Era.
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Unread 03-03-2010, 12:01 AM
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Chapter 4
A Truly Continental Congress

The whole idea of rebellion started in Boston, so it was only appropriate that it would begin there as well. On April 19 Paul Revere made his midnight ride alerting militias that the British were moving out. Throughout the night and day skirmishes of little strategic value played out, but the Revolution was underway.

The Battle of Lexington and Concord led to the massive siege of Boston that would last a year. The Siege of Boston’s most memorable event was the British’s Pyrrhic victory at Bunker Hill. While the main colonies scrambled to get their acts together the real fighting took place further north in Canada where British garrisons left over from the French and Indian War were readily available to fight en masse.

Guy Carleton, the former British Governor of Quebec, turned out to be a very adept commander. He moved quickly to secure Canada for the rebellion. Montreal, Quebec, Ticonderoga, Crown Point, and various smaller towns and forts of importance fell with the exception of Halifax whose Royal Navy presence along with various British garrisons who had retreated there during the lightning campaign across Canada, ensured attacking armies couldn’t do to terribly much. By mid summer of 1776, Canada and Boston were secure. The second Continental Congress was meeting as well, this time with a much larger goal.

The representatives from the West Indies arrived in Philadelphia quite surprised that war had broken out and were even more surprised at how well it was doing. Because of the distance of their colonies they had no clue of the fighting and quickly sent messengers back to their respective islands. The key to the West Indies battle plan was all about surprise.

The Continental Army under George Washington was established for the Seaboard Colonies while the Continental Army of the North confirmed Guy Carleton as Commander of those Canadian Forces already at work. The Continental Navy was also established though its role would increase dramatically in a few months. To fund all of this the Continental Treasury was established with a large supply of gold bullion that had been "raised, captured from the British, and donated" by founding fathers like Thomas Jefferson and Ben Franklin. In reality this bullion supply was raised via the replicator plates but the public needed a legitimate excuse and when an "accidental fire" burned the false paper trail, Congress finally had the money on hand to fund the revolution, arguably even better than the British.

With all the practical details squared away, in early summer, Congress entrusted Jefferson to write the nation's new Declaration of Independence and thus on July 4, 1776 a new nation was born.
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Unread 03-03-2010, 12:01 AM
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Chapter 4.5
A Navy Fit For a Continent

"I don't care that the rebellion has done well on the mainland, what incentive do we have to fight when the Royal Navy controls the Caribbean waters?" asked Daniel Maynard, a continental representative from Dominica.

It was a good question, fighting skirmishes and battles against ill prepared and surprised garrisons across the mainland was one thing, securing the Caribbean against the might of the Royal Navy was a completely different issue.

"We will indeed need to take steps to counter the King's navy," said John Dalling, the leader and former governor of Jamaica, "Thankfully this is an issue we have prepared for."

"Perhaps you would like to enlighten the rest of us to these illegal and secretive 'preparations' Mr. Dalling..." sarcastically asked Paul Wellington, a representative from Barbados.

Wellington was an ardent pacifist and leaned a little to pro-British even for the open likes of the Continental Congress. Regardless, Wellington was a brilliant politician and leader and was crucial to keeping Barbados in the fold.

"I had no idea that illegal and secretive were new adjectives for preparedness," shot back Dalling who was also nonchalantly fiddling with the ring on his hand. "Nonetheless ideas and preparations have been made by myself and Mr. Briggs."

William Briggs, a representative from Grenada, was one of the most pro-American and influential figures in the Continental Congress, and the de facto leader of the Caribbean. He had taken his newfound mission in the Order of Freedom with a vigor that might top all the others. He was also a former Royal Navy captain and had been granted the rank of commodore by the Continental Congress. While he wasn't present at this meeting, dropping his name perked up the ears of those West Indians present and put Wellington in his place.

"We have a four pronged plan for the rapid establishment of a Continental Navy that will work to secure the Caribbean for ourselves," began Dalling. "Firstly with our newfound funds in the treasury, we will have Boston, New York, Providence, and other ship yards begin ship building immediately. Using our funds we have reached an accord with the royal governments of both France and Spain to purchase several older ships. Agents working in Amsterdam and Paris have also secured the backing of several former Dutch and French naval officers and shipwrights who will come to America to help get us on our feet. While we have no lack of good sailors and strong backs, we do have a lack of experienced officers and this will help us catch up to the British. We will take advantage of the pirate surplus in the Caribbean and issue letters of marque at every port we have. Anyone who wants to harass British shipping and keep the Royal Navy bottled up is a friend of ours and to get those privateers attacking warships we have added a clause in which the treasury pays privateers for the sinking or capture of enemy war vessels. Finally, the news of the war is spreading slowly, especially to the Caribbean. We have organized local militias to work undercover in the docks in a coordinated night assault to capture unawares naval ships and crews."

The council of Caribbean leaders around Dalling were a bit shocked, so Dalling wrapped up his plan.

"With the money we have and a strategic use of bold initative, planning, ordnances, and the element of surprise we can defeat the King's navy and keep the Caribbean in this war."

One by one, the men around Dalling began to nod.
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Unread 03-03-2010, 12:02 AM
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Chapter 5
Boats and Battles

While the Second Continental Congress was meeting, the West Indies delegates had sent messengers speeding towards the Caribbean to inform their respected islands of the rebellion and to carry out their battle plan.

Essentially the West Indies rebellion was doomed to failure if the majority of the Royal Navy escaped initial capture. So almost from the get-go, the various populations of the Caribbean islands took British forts, garrisons, and most importantly anchored ships, by surprise. By the end of the year every island had largely acquired its quota of captured ships. Shipyards in New England as well as Charleston and Kingston were working at a fever pitch to build ships. Former officers from Holland and France had arrived and began to train American counterparts, with them came several fine quality warships purchased from France and Spain with replicated gold, they would form the main initial fighting force of the Continental navy and kept British warships on their toes and out of the Caribbean for some time. Pirates turned privateer destroyed British and loyalist shipping and several bold maneuvers even took down or captured Royal Navy sloops and frigates. The American Privateer operation was one of the war's more interesting theaters. Privateers worked all over the globe harassing the British from Jamaica to India to England herself. Privateering turned private captains and struggling pirates like John Paul Jones, Samuel Mason, Jose Gaspar, William Anders, and Turku Abbas into American legends.

The summer of 1776 however wasn’t all fun and games for the Patriots. John Burgoyne and his army arrived in Halifax and Howe arrived in New York. Burgoyne had no problems landing his soldiers as Halifax was still firmly in English hands Howe however landed right into one of the Revolutions biggest battles, the Battle of New York. Washington and Howe squared off on Long Island, in Brooklyn Heights, and all over the area of New York. The British won a decisive victory however and were close to capturing the Continental Army and finishing off the heart of the war right then and there. Washington however engineered a brilliant night escape with the assistance of a heavy fog.

Just after Washington’s failed stand in New York, Burgoyne’s army engaged Carleton’s at Quebec. Carleton’s Army of the North fought valiantly and bravely and inflicted much more casualties than Washington did to the British in the south, however the better trained British troops overtook the Continental’s positions and Carleton was forced to retreat to Trois Rivieres and set up Winter Camp.

The Continental’s however got a land victory on Christmas Eve at the end of 1776 when Washington stealthily crossed the Delaware River and ambushed and defeated a garrison of Hessian troops at Trenton. This was followed by a direct victory over Howe at Princeton. It was cold and victories were few and far between but this revolution still had life in it.
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Unread 03-03-2010, 12:03 AM
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Chapter 5.5
The Battle of Barbados

Samuel Greene had never seen combat before, he was a simple merchant here on this tiny Caribbean paradise. He took local sugar cane grown on the plantations and sold it to various merchants in the port for profit. Now here he was in the middle of the night on a rickety old row boat making his way to a Royal Navy Ship of the Line! Greene had only been on a boat twice, once to make his way from Bristol in his native England to Barbados and three years ago when he went to Nassau in the Bahamas for a Wedding of a prominent client.

Greene was in the boat with fifteen other Patriots, seven boats in all were quietly making their way to the HMS Insufferable. They had one goal, capture the ship while in anchor with the crew unawares. The boats reached the side of the ship and the men slowly made their way up the various lines and rigging, they were ever so stealthy, the entire mission depended on stealth. Greene snuck up behind a Royal Navy sailor on guard. He had never killed a man before, nor did he have the desire to. He only joined the rebellion because the local leaders of Barbados were positive that the King would go tax mad if he had his way in Boston, everything would be taxed in the colonies, including sugar in Barbados. And that would ruin Greene. But was it worth killing a man? Before he had his answer a man yelled out across the deck and gun shots were fired. The guard turned and faced Greene. When he tried to draw his sword Greene shot him where he stood. The ship was a riot for about 10 minutes then it went quiet. The Patriots had taken the ship. They weren’t out of the water yet though.

The HMS Stewart began firing on her from across the bay, the rebels that had been sent to capture her must not have been so lucky. The Insufferable began to slowly return fire but the shots were amateur and inaccurate, it would only be a matter of time before the Stewart honed in on its target in the night and delivered the death blow. Suddenly the Stewart erupted in a blast of fire. On the other side of the bay the Patriots saw muzzle flashes, Greene squinted hard and made out another Royal Navy ship, some kind of Brig or smaller ship.

The mystery ship sailed up next to the Insufferable and the crew began to cheer. They weren’t rebels, but Royal Navy sailors. The captain came out on deck and explained that they believed in the rebel cause and had mutinied as soon as they heard the rebellion was under way. They made all haste to port and had arrived just in time to save the Insufferable. If this was the case all across the Caribbean Greene thought, then the Patriots just might have a chance…
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Chapter 6
Times that Try Men’s Souls

Washington had earned some morale boosting victories but strategically the Continentals in Canada and the 13 colonies were losing ground fast. During the spring and summer of 1777 it seemed at times the only thing going right for the rebellion was, of all things, the success of the Continental Navy. Commodore John Paul Jones’ small fleet was brilliant in one on one combat against British ships, harassing everything from merchants to ships of line from Boston to Bristol. In the Caribbean Commodore William Briggs was doing a fine job of keeping the British out, though he was beginning to grow unsure of how long he could hold off the entire British Navy by himself. Already assaults on Nassau, St. Kitts, and Dominica had been narrowly held off; it was only a matter of time until an island fell.

September of 1777 also saw the disastrous Philadelphia Campaign. Washington’s forces were defeated at the Battle of Brandywine which led to Congress’ evacuation of the capital and British occupation. Washington and Howe squared off at Germantown were the British won again and Washington came dangerously close again to losing his army. After a few more skirmishes his beleaguered army set up winter camp in Valley Forge.

October saw more losses as Carleton and the Army of the North defended Trois Rivieres from Burgoyne’s attack. Like Washington at Germantown, Carleton narrowly escaped a terrible defeat, retreating back to Montreal. The tide would turn at Montreal however.

Carleton set up his defenses at the outskirts town of Vercheres. Burgoyne engaged him in a vicious battle. This time however Carleton, working closely with a capable young commander named Benedict Arnold who had been assigned to lead the American forces in Canada, bested Burgoyne breaking his army and forcing him to retreat all the way back to Quebec.

In a year of struggles for the Colonials, the Battle of Vercheres was where the tide turned. The colonies had proven that they could fight and a coalition in Europe, eager to see English dominance fall, lead by France declared their support to the Revolutionary cause.
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Unread 03-14-2010, 10:20 AM
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I can has more?
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Unread 03-16-2010, 09:40 PM
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Chapter 6.5
Victory from Defeat

Samuel Greene had learned much in a year on the USS Liberty (Formerly HMS Insufferable). A year ago today he was climbing the rigging and fighting Redcoats for the first time, nervous about his part in a revolution and impending Naval Combat. Now he was a seasoned veteran of one of the war’s most interesting theaters, the Caribbean. However even though his travels had taken him from Barbados to the Mosquito Coast he had never seen a battle like the one he was engaged in currently in Nassau.

The Liberty was one of only ten American ships engaged against a British Invasion fleet of 14, allegedly lead by Admiral George Rodney himself. And while it was true the Royal Navy might have had the American fleet outclassed, they didn’t have them outgunned. The Fort of Nassau ensured the British wouldn’t take the town easily, coupled with the very respectable American fleet; the battle was more even than one would imagine. And it wasn’t like the American’s didn’t have a good commander; Commodore William Briggs had risen fast in the ranks of great naval commanders during the war so far. Even though opposing commanders had better tactics, his ability to communicate with the fleet and have all of his captains on the same page and make quick adjustments was unfathomable. A myth ran around both fleets that Briggs was the ghost of Sir Francis Drake coordinating his fleet from all points in revenge for a British Empire that had lost its way. A sighting of Briggs on multiple ships during a battle was not uncommon, but it was only myth, at least it had to be.

The Battle of Nassau was easily the most important battle of Greene’s naval career thus far and it was proving to be just as epic. The fort was taking a pounding as was the American fleet; however for every cannon ball that struck home, the Americans made two. Greene stood in awe on the Liberty as the 98 gun Ship of the line HMS Formidable; Rodney’s flagship, engaged the 80 gun ship of the line USS Justice, Briggs’ flagship. The two ships hit each other with a mutual broadside, however when the smoke cleared the Formidable had lost its main mast and was on fire, the Justice was badly damaged but she sailed onward and the American flag still waved proudly from her mast. The battle soon turned in the American’s favor and the British fleet had to limp back defeated to St. Augustine. The Americans had won a costly battle, losing four ships to the British’s five, but it was a victory nonetheless. The Americans still held the Caribbean...
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

It was early November outside Montreal and snow flurries were becoming common; it would only be a matter of time until the Canadian Winter brought about the close of the 1777 Campaign season. Sgt. Jean Sallee was hoping against hope that winter would be spent in Montreal, not some camp like the Continentals under Washington were preparing in Valley Forge, exposed to the elements. That decision was about to be made here in an outskirts town called Vercheres. The British under Burgoyne were making the last assault of 1777, hoping to close out a year of complete royal dominance on land.

Sallee readied his troops, their earthworks were prepared and rifles were loaded, every bullet and grain of powder in Montreal was in this town in hopes of repelling the British. The redcoats began their march and their cannon began to boom as explosions rained on the field of battle. The Canadians responded with cannon fire of their own, and when the British were in range, rifle fire.

Sallee was firing his gun as fast as he good, these muskets weren’t exactly fast to fire but a good soldier could get a few shots off a minute, Sallee was determined to get as many as he could.

The Continentals of the North were doing their deadly deed as well as anyone in the world, still however Burgoyne’s troops reached their lines and brutal hand to hand combat broke out. Sallee had no time to fire anymore, it was time for bayonets and musket butts. Continental cannon and British cannon were firing as close to the Continentals lines as possible adding random explosions of shrapnel and mud to the chaos. Sallee was a God fearing man, if he wasn’t so sure he was still alive, he would have sworn he was in hell.

At the height of the battle however a fresh company of soldiers lead by a young Colonel from the southern colonies named Benedict Arnold arrived. The company of colonials from the south charged, bayonets fixed and rifles firing. With their colonel cutting anything in a red coat that moved from his mount, the Yankees made all the difference in such a close battle. The British began to retreat. Smelling blood for the first time since the war began, the Continentals gladly gave chase.

Before long the British cannon and emplacements were overrun and the Redcoats began the flight all the way back to Quebec. It seemed winter would be spent in Montreal after all.
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Chapter 7
World at War

King George would later be proved to be a little insane, but he wasn’t a complete fool. The world had just gone to war; India and Europe just flew to the top of the priority list. No longer could whole armies be thrown at the quagmire that was America in hope of crushing a distant rebellion. Instead this would become a war of raids, Indioes, and the occasional battle. If England couldn’t crush the rebellion in one fell swoop, it could definitely outlast them in a war of attrition. Besides it was only a matter of time before this alliance of colonies collapsed in on itself. And it wasn’t like things were dire in the Americas. The British still ruled the seas despite set backs in the Caribbean. Halifax, Quebec, Philadelphia, New York, and St. Augustine were still firmly in British control and could act as staging points for continued war.

And that’s exactly what the British did, they were occupied elsewhere, what else were they supposed to do? Everything was bottled up in the Americas. General Cornwallis had arrived in St. Augustine with a force; they would march north from East Florida and attempt to incite rebellion in the loyalist south. Guy Carleton had Quebec surrounded but a Royal Navy presence and lack of cannons kept him from making progress. All the while Indioes Wars raged and the British still held the colonial capital.

In June 1778 however a surprise arrival and attack took the war to a whole new level. Commodore John Paul Jones had been coordinating with Horatio Gates and Benedict Arnold for a bold recapture of New York City. Reconnaissance had proven that the British Garrison there was nothing special and several Royal Navy ships had been redeployed elsewhere. The city was ripe for the picking and the opportunistic commanders were more than willing to seize the day.

So Jones sailed his modest fleet of captured British warships and several new frigates and engaged the British fleet in the largest American-British Naval Battle of the War. All the while Gates and Arnold surprised the British garrison and captured New York in a decisive victory. Artillery from New York’s defenses was pointed towards the British fleet and combined with Jones’ fleet smashed the Royal Navy anchored there. The Americans had taken casualties and Jones had lost several valuable ships but New York was taken and the British had suddenly lost one of the aces in their sleeve.

All the while the world was falling into chaos, the British were gearing for war with the Netherlands and they were at the brink of war with the Mysoreans in India. Burgoyne was stuck in Quebec and Howe in Philadelphia. Admiral Rodney had barely escaped with his life after engaging a combined Spanish-French-American fleet off the Bahamas in a second attempt to get something going there in the largest all around naval battle of the war. The hopes of the entire war hinged on Cornwallis and Howe being able to pull something off in the South.
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Chapter 7.5
New York, New York


Patrick Monahan had seen some combat during the war, however it was nothing on the scale his army was about to try. Heck he wasn’t sure anything in the war thus far would be as big as what they were about to try and the war had seen some pretty big battles from Nassau to Montreal. His army under Horatio Gates was to work with General Benedict Arnold’s army and the navy under Commodore John Paul Jones to boldly retake New York City.

His rifle was loaded and he had everything he needed, which was very little. Gates had told his men to take only what they needed for combat into battle, the soldiers would need to move fast and light less the battle get bogged down and go south.

They left Trenton before dawn and by the time they reached New York, Monahan could already hear cannon fire. Once they emerged from the trees and began charging the city, they could see the naval battle being fought in the harbor between the Royal Navy at anchor and the surprise American fleet under Jones.

Soon cannon fire was replaced by musket fire as Gates army attacked the western flank of the city. Nearly thirty minutes of door to door fighting later, musket fire began to be heard on the Eastern side of the city as Arnold’s army could be heard from further down Long Island after a secret landing. Arnold's arrival and his subsequent scattering of a Brooklyn Hessian garrison overwhelmed the British allowing the Americans to make great progress in the battle that until then had been very even.

The fighting was brutal and Monahan was even been scrapped by a shot while his ferry crossed to Manhattan. However when the largest British ship went up in flames from a direct hit to her powder stores, morale was restored to the advancing Continentals. By late midday after intense fighting on the island and a British counter attack against Manhattan, the city lay quiet from musket fire; the majority of the British garrison had been captured including commander the Earl Richard Howe, brother of Sir William Howe. However the fleets were still duking it out in the harbor as the Royal Navy was proving its toughness. The Americans however took captured cannon and turned them to the harbor at dusk. Their fire coupled with Jones’ fleet saw the last British ship sink as the last rays of light disappeared into the night. New York City had been retaken and the war for Independence just got much more interesting.


The Movements for the Second Battle of New York. Horatio Gates attacked from the west and comprised the majority of the Continental assault force while Benedict Arnold attacked from the east and pushed past British defences on Long Island and Brooklyn. Commodore John Paul Jones tied up the Royal Navy with his fleet. The surprise capture of New York City turned the tide of the war.
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Chapter 8
Southern War

General Cornwallis was moving north from St. Augustine Florida, hoping to incite a loyalist uprising and open and maintain a successful British front in the south. Cornwallis was a formidable foe and if he could link up with Howe, who was expected to move south from Philadelphia, which would be very bad news for the colonials.

Luckily the Americans had friends. A Spanish commander named Bernardo Galvez arrived in Georgia with experienced reinforcements. Galvez had led some minor expeditions against some British outposts and brought a fresh army from West Florida. Washington was reinforced by Gates and Arnold from New York fresh from their victory there. They began to prepare defenses around Baltimore for the clash sure to come from Howe.

Cornwallis struck first; with Royal Navy support he took Savannah in October and followed that up with a victory at Charleston to start the 1780 campaign season. The rest of the summer was filled with minor skirmishes between various militias, Indioes, Cornwallis’ troops, and loyalist militias. The south became a strange battlefield, one day neighbors helped each other work the land and the next day the same neighbors began shooting at each other over whose side they were on and repeating the process until one died. Still the rebels couldn’t buy a break all summer. Even when Horatio Gates was sent south to command the Continentals, he was met with a disastrous defeat at Camden that led Cornwallis to invade North Carolina. The Continentals finally got their break in late 1780 when an all volunteer army defeated a major loyalist militia at Kings Mountain. This was followed by an early 1781 victory by the Americas at Cowpens to take the fight back into South Carolina.

At this point the British were bogged down. Loyalist uprisings either never materialized or were crushed by rebels. Hordes of soldiers from the north and the frontiers arrived to back up their patriot brothers. It didn’t help the British cause that Howe was basically trapped in Philadelphia. The summer of 1781 was marked by continued fighting across the south. Nathaniel Greene, Daniel Morgan, Bernardo Galvez were only some of the commanders who fought the British and won. Late in 1781 a desperate Cornwallis began marching north hoping to converge on Baltimore allowing Howe to come down and combine armies in a planned breakout attempt. His hopes were dashed when his messenger to Howe was intercepted and he was corned at New Bern North Carolina by a massive Continental Army led by Washington himself. When French and American ships appeared on the horizon instead of the Royal Navy, Cornwallis surrendered.

With Howe and Burgoyne still cornered and out of the war, the massive surrenders of New York and Cornwallis still fresh on the British minds, and a very unsuccessful war in India and Europe, the British sued for peace. In 1783 with the Treaty of Paris the Americans won their Independence.


Map of Revolutionary War Battles
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Chapter 9
A New Nation


The first day after the Treaty of Paris was unusual. The Americans, from St. Kitts to Canada knew they had won their freedom, but now it was formal. Now they could fly the flag without being shot at. However work continued throughout the nation, besides the USA had been a quiet battlefield for some time now and it was time to rebuild. Forests needed to be felled, cropland needed plowing, and goods needed to be bought and sold. But even though the guns were silent, the real battle was just beginning.

The world knew the USA could fight and operate in times of war, but could it operate during times of peace? The nation got off to a rough start.

The nation was governed by the incredibly weak Articles of Confederation. This initial constitution was created hastily during the war and at a time when a powerful effective central government was feared and undesired. While the nation was confederated together the individual states held enormous power and did little to benefit the nation as a whole. These problems were especially true in the fringe areas of the nation, Canada and the Caribbean. Two of the most prominent problems were Quebec’s ratification of French as their official language when all the other states worked in English, and in the Caribbean several states led by Jamaica began to coin their own money citing the government’s inability to get ample quantities of currency to their distant western region of the Caribbean. Even on the core Eastern seaboard, problems and fractures were appearing in the confederation with the boiling point coming with Shay’s Rebellion in Massachusetts over debts and taxes. The Articles simply were not working; it was time for something new.

Just after the rebellion in 1787 delegates from all across the nation met once more in Philadelphia to fix the Articles of confederation. What they got was a completely new Constitution. At the constitutional convention things were slowly being hammered out. Washington and Carleton were given Presidency and vice presidency of the convention though they accepted reluctantly and remained heavily neutral and away from the politics.

The election of Washington and Carleton was about the only that went smoothly. Two of the biggest debates were over representation and rights. The Virginia delegation came up with the Virginia plan of representation which called for representation based on population. The large states such as Virginia, New York, Quebec, and Jamaica favored this plan while the smaller states and especially the islands opposed it. The smaller states opposition, led by North Carolina delegate Charles Goodwright, made the make the grievous error of suggesting some of the smaller states and islands band together to create larger states. This lead to a three day protest walk out by small state delegates at the urging of Cayman Islands delegate Louis Victroix mostly from the Caribbean and smaller Eastern states like Delaware. The walkout nearly derailed the entire convention and for some time the future of the nation seemed to be in peril.

The Constitutional walk out gave New Jersey delegate William Patterson, working closely with delegate Paul Taylor of Grenada, time to come up with the New Jersey and Grenada Plan which called for equal representation. The two plans along with several others polarized the convention until Roger Sherman’s proposed Connecticut plan was received. The Connecticut plan called for a bicameral legislature with the House based on population and the senate with equal votes for all states. While not well received at first, the plan grew on the delegates and it was agreed upon.

One crucial battle that remained was the representations vote in the Electoral College for President. The large states were up in arms over the various states of the Caribbean having such a powerful say in presidential elections (Under the Connecticut Plan even the smallest state would have three electoral votes). 15 states in the Caribbean with a very low population were looking at 45 electoral votes, which nearly accounted for a half of the vote available. After much debate East Floridian representative James Fellows came up with the Caribbean Prerogative which stated that any state or territory smaller than 1,500 sq. miles and with a population less than 80,000 would be given two senators representation, one representative in the House, and one electoral vote in presidential elections. This system allowed small states like Nevis and the Cayman Islands to have say in the elections but not so much as to throw off the majority’s wishes. It should be noted that for such a radical proposition to be passed, the Order of Freedom had to use their rings fairly liberally to bring the small islands on board.

Apportionment was a complicated issue but was slowly being worked out. Each state was guaranteed at least one representative but one representative is limited to at least 30,000 peoples with Congress given the ability to set the total number of representatives. All of the representation would be made based upon the censuses that would occur. Of course since one had yet to occur the delegates provided the original number.

Delaware: 1, Pennsylvania: 8, New Jersey: 4, Georgia: 3, West Florida: 1, Connecticut: 5, Dominica: 1, Grenada: 1, Nevis: 1, East Florida: 1, Cayman Islands: 1, Massachusetts: 8, Quebec: 5, Maryland: 6, St. Vincent & the Grenadines: 1. Antigua: 1, South Carolina: 5, Barbados: 2, New Hampshire: 3
Virginia: 10, Nova Scotia: 6, The Bahamas: 1, Turks and Caicos: 1, Honduras: 1
New York: 6, Newfoundland: 1, St. Lucia: 1, Montserrat: 1, St. Kitts: 1, Anguilla: 1, Virgin Islands: 1, Jamaica: 4, North Carolina: 5, Mosquito Coast: 1, Barbuda: 1, St. John’s Island: 1, Rhode Island & Providence Plantations: 1.

Another issue that was discussed was slavery. Those states with few or no slaves wanted slaves to be taxed as people but no included in representation. States where slavery was large wanted slaves to be taxed as property but counted when determining representation. The issue of slavery was a big one for the convention and also threatened a walk out by several states. After a few days of heated debate it was determined that slaves would be taxed as property, the slave trade could only be outlawed by state governments, and 3/5 of the total slave population would be counted for representation purposes. The 3/5 compromise as it was called had some hefty concessions by both sides as the non slave states now had no say in the slave trade and taxes in the south would be lower as a whole while the slave states (who wanted 3/4 at least) only achieved 3/5. The slavery debate would simmer for years and was only just beginning.

After representation was figured out and the other polarizing issue of slavery was effectively put on the sidelines for now, it was time to discuss a bill of rights to ensure certain freedoms could not be taken away by the government. While the Bill of Rights was not written into the Constitution, in order to get states to ratify it, the Bill of Rights became the first amendments to the Constitution providing unalienable rights to the citizens of the country and protecting their speech, freedoms, religions, and justice. While the Constitution didn’t satisfy everyone, Benjamin Franklin put it best…

"There are several parts of this Constitution which I do not at present approve, but I am not sure I shall never approve them. ... I doubt to whether any other Convention we can obtain, may be able to make a better Constitution. ... It therefore astonishes me, Sir, to find this system approaching so near to perfection as it does; and I think it will astonish our enemies..."

On September 17, 1787 the Constitution of the United States was ratified and signed. Now the new nation needed people in their government…
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Chapter 9.5
A Secret Meeting


The Order of Freedom convened at Thomas Jefferson’s home in Virginia, Monticello. The great estate had been designed entirely by Jefferson and apparently he had even grander plans working in his mind, something about a university or something.

All of the members gathered for the first time since the pre-revolutionary meeting at Mount Vernon. They had had a small meeting just after the war but the abruptness of it didn’t allow everyone to attend and it was more of a debriefing and dinner than anything else. This however was a big meeting. They were to discuss new members and where to go from here.

Washington and Franklin were getting up in age and would soon need to be replaced for lack of a better word. And how would the US go about expanding?

The men debated each other for nearly three days posing different questions while regaling each other in war stories, especially Commodore Briggs who liberally used his teleporter during battle making his stories all the more thrilling.

The easiest debate was about new members, it was decided that the Order’s members would nominate and vote on potential new members as needed. The head of the Order, which until now everyone had assumed was simply Washington, would be chosen by a secret vote amongst all members with no nominations and inter group campaigning. The first new member was voted on at the urging of Franklin who wanted a replacement ready since he was nearing the end of his life. After half a day of nominations and debate, James Madison would be given the invite to replace Franklin when his time came.

The topic of where to go from here was much more interesting. Jefferson and Sam Adams advocated traveling the world immediately and convincing groups to begin asking for annexation using their tools to convince them. Washington and the older members frequently found themselves reminding them that the rings only influenced people, and didn’t control their minds.

Again, Franklin summed it up best. “A Nation like a house built in haste, will collapse during the first storm.”

Guy Carleton came up with a good compromise plan for expansion. Only when other nations started conflict with the US would the Order expand liberally on the condition they make it seem realistic. If the entire nation of France suddenly joined the US, the world would easily suspect something and lead the charge against the still infant nation. The US needed to expand, but everyone had to admit, the Order still had several centuries until the alluded doomsday deadline. While the members would set a strong foundation for a united earth that could weather Franklin’s metaphorical storms, none would live to see it truly united.
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Chapter 10
The Grand Experiment


The new Constitution of the United States had been put in place and slowly the states began to ratify it. However a system of government can only go so far, the nation still needed a real government. So Democracy was set in action as the various states set elections and sent senators and representatives to New York City, acting capital of the nation. 1789 however saw the nations first Presidential Election.

The nation was expecting a heated race between its three heroes, George Washington, Guy Carleton, and William Briggs. The men decided it would not be in the nation’s interest to split the country along partisan lines, especially between the 13 colonies, Canada, and the Caribbean. Carleton and Briggs decided to allow Washington, already their leader in the Order, to run as the front runner, even though Washington was very reluctant to run at all. Carleton did just enough to garner enough electoral votes (there was no popular vote for the first election) to become Vice President.



The 1789 Presidential Election



Washington put together an All-Star first Cabinet with Jefferson as Secretary of State, fiscally minded Alexander Hamilton as Treasurer, Briggs as Secretary of War, and Edmund Randolph as Attorney General.

Washington did much to ensure the nation got on its feet and establish the Presidency as a legitimate republican office. He established many precedents for future Presidents to use including setting his title as simply Mr. President and most importantly not running for a third term (Washington was again unanimously elected in 1792 after Carleton retired to be the second governor of Quebec and Briggs followed suit becoming governor of St. Kitts.)

Domestically Washington put down the Whiskey Rebellion and saw three of the first new states enter the Union with Kentucky, Tennessee, and Vermont as well as the final ratification of the Constitution by the original states. Washington also acted as the Commander in Chief of the Northwest Indioes War in which US forces clashed with Indioes tribes in Ohio and Indiana. After some initial defeats of the poorly trained and equipped militias the US decided to raise a small Legion of the United States which would be professionally trained and equipped to fight the Indioes. With better results in the mid 1790’s the Shawnee, Miami, Ottawa, Chippewa, Iroquois, Sauk, and Fox all ceded land in the Northwest Territories.



The 1792 Presidential Election

Overseas things were spiraling out of control rapidly. The French Revolution was in full swing and Europe was at war. Jefferson’s Republicans and the majority of Americans wanted to support their French revolutionary brothers, especially the Quebecoise French. The government and the Federalists however wanted to take a more neutral stance with a slight British leaning. This led to many protests and arguments but thankfully no outright fighting internally. Because the US decided to not take a stance the impatient French revolutionaries began to denounce the US government and appeal directly to the US public for help, going as far as to send an envoy into the US, bypass the federal government, and rally support for France among the people.

With relations deteriorating quickly between the French and Americans, Washington sent Chief Justice John Jay to Britain to smooth out things between the two nations which were very tense. Britain maintained a weak claim on parts of North America and some agents operated from within US territory to supply Indioes forces in their war against the US. While the British troops had all gone, the Royal Navy still operated heavily out of Bermuda as well as some under the table deals with the Dutch and Danes to operate out of their colonies, and would harass American shipping, especially near French colonies. Jay, thankfully, managed to end all British intervention in North America and the Caribbean, and set up a commission to handle claims against debts and shipping that carried over from the revolution.

The Jay Treaty was a polarizing event for the US, the north and Caribbean (which could now trade freely with nearby French colonies and send the Sugar worry free to Britain) supported it and the Federalists. The French Quebecoise and southern planters denounced it. The treaty eased tensions between the US and Britain but worsened them with the French.

The bickering between the US, France, and Britain was not all the US partook in diplomatically. Washington pursued friendly relations with the Spanish, and allowed for tribute to flow to the Pasha of Tripoli, setting the stage for the US involvement on the Barbary Coast. The tensions between the British and French and the fact that the US was practically paying tribute to Tripoli caused Washington to rethink his decision to maintain a weak navy. The US navy at the time was very small and consisted of seven out of date ships either purchased from France and Spain or built hastily in the revolution itself. Washington called for the construction of 10 new ships to protect America’s vast shores and be able to hold her own should a war occur. Washington also reestablished the Marines which had disbanded briefly after the Revolution. Commodore William Briggs, former secretary of war and governor of St. Kitts, was put in charge of the new brigade since Briggs favored unorthodox, mobile, and amphibious tactics. Many believe Brigg’s training of the Marines opened the door for light covert and successful operations and was key for US success in its first wars despite the odds.

In the endWashington saw the nation through its infancy and left it prospering. However his dream of non partisan politics had been shattered by Hamilton and Jefferson and their respective Federalist and Democratic-Republican parties. Hamilton’s Federalists supported a strong manufacturing and finance sector, wanted a strong central government, a national bank, and good relations with Britain. Exactly the opposite the Republicans wanted strong state government, an agrarian economy, and good relations with France. 1796 would see the nation’s first heated election.
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Chapter 10.5
Federalists and Republicans



Federalists and Republicans
How the First American Parties Formed and Why



By August Sonereal

In his famed farewell address, President George Washington warned against the danger of political parties. Despite this, the first political parties were already forming; the Federalists led by Alexander Hamilton and the Democratic-Republicans led by Thomas Jefferson. But what led to the formation of these parties despite the stern warnings of influential founding fathers? It was indeed a process that spanned nearly a decade, provided clear cut opposites for people, and polarized the young nation that created the first parties. In such an atmosphere it was only a matter of when and not if for the parties to establish themselves and once they did the future of American politics and American history would never be the same.

Britain vs. France
This was at the core of the debate for the two parties in terms of foreign parties. The Federalists supported strong ties with Britain mainly due to economic prosperity while the Republicans supported France due largely to France’s past help in the Revolutionary War and their common revolutionary cause. Of course their was no real room for middle ground as the two nations were arguably the greatest powers in the world and of course, were at war.

Washington and the nation initially tried to take a middle approach but this only led to conflict with Britain, still bearing a grudge against the Americans, and the French, angry the Americans didn’t immediately come to their aid.

Of course the population of the United States, just years after the end of their war against Britain, was polarized based on which side they supported. French Quebecoise were ardent supporters of the French Revolution to the point where a small unit of Quebecoise went to France to fight against the king. The majority of the American public was also on board with helping the French; anything that hurt Britain and helped their ally was good by them.

However while France enjoyed widespread public support at the beginning, either through ancestry, past experiences, and even rallying at the hands of French officials sent overseas to sway America to help, the British were not without their supporters. Manufactures, traders, and sugar planters all had a vested interest to keep trade routes open to Britain and the not anger the Royal Navy. They formed the backbone of the pro-British camp and helped to make the trading and manufacturing center of the north and the sugar and trading center of the Caribbean become Federalist as opposed to Quebec and some other areas Republican.

Industrialization vs. Agriculture
Another area of polarizing debate was which direction should the new nation go economically? Republicans and Jefferson envisioned a nation of small farmers working the land and where agriculture was king. This was supported largely by the rural population which did work the land but also by those who owned large plantations in cotton (which was beginning to catch on in the mainland south) and sugar in the Caribbean.

On the opposite end of the spectrum where the federalists who favored development, manufacturing, and industrialization. While those who supported such a route where few in number they made up for their numbers with their wealth. At a time when the vote was limited to older property owners, this gave them considerable clout, especially when they could fund candidates and campaigns properly when the small farmer lacked the capital and influence.

Because of this issue it is easy to see why the north, the home base of these wealthy individuals and area of most manufacturing development was a Federalist stronghold whereas the south and Appalachia where Republican. A strange area is the Caribbean where sugar planters had to make a choice. Though they favored the Republicans agrarian message, there would be no point if their shipping lands and biggest market suddenly closed; hence why the Caribbean voted Federalist.

Bank vs. No Bank
One of the largest issues of the early United States was that of the central bank and the economy. Hamilton favored absorbing the states’ war debts and securities and establishing a national debt and a line of national credit. A national bank would be created to provide loans, handle federal funds, provide currency, and overall act as the nexus of the federal financial system. Finally a system of tariffs and subsidies would be implemented to protect industry at home and promote its growth.

The Republicans, led by Jefferson and James Madison were opposed to this strategy. Believing state debt needed to be handled with more detail, the constitution did not provide for a bank, and a system of high tariffs would be sufficient to promote home industry.

The issue of the bank was largely a political one as such a bank and economy would benefit little the small farmer or worker. Regardless the Republicans tended to be anti-bank because it was their party’s outlook. The wealthy federalists mentioned above ardently supported the bank, though not so much the system of tariffs and subsides as they actually favored the Republicans high tariffs to protect their home markets. This was not enough usually to sway them Republican.

It was only through a series of compromises which included the location of the national capital, that Hamilton’s school of thought was implemented. The national debt was created, the bank was charted in 1791, and the system of tariffs and subsidies was implemented. All of these worked brilliantly, especially the acquisition of state debt and establishment of a line of credit. It all proved the new nation could handle its affairs, pay its debts, and established the credit and funds necessary for the US to engage in wars and acquire land; something it would be doing heavily over the next few years.

Strong Government vs. State’s Rights
The final issue was that of a strong government vs. one with its rights and power vested to the states. Hamilton and the federalists like a strong federal government while Jefferson and the Republicans favored the states. This battle came down largely to an ideological one based almost on past experiences.

While all of the former colonies wanted states rights due to their recent experiences under the thumb of a king, some liked direct control more than others. The Caribbean for example had a long history of direct control and the peripheral region exposed to the might of the Royal Navy liked a strong central government that could protect it quickly and efficiently. On the opposite end of the spectrum, Catholic and French Quebec liked running its own affairs and often saw itself as its own nation locked in a military and economic alliance with its fellow states. Many colonies took varied approaches to this based on their history, military exposure, economy, and outlook based on the above mentioned issues. In the end the Caribbean and New England tended to favor a strong government while Quebec, and the middle and southern states tended to favor the states.
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I can has more?
Yes...yes you can

PS: I'll be posting pictures and correcting some format stuff tomorrow when I get some time.
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Chapter 11
XYZ’s and a Quasi War


America’s first real election took place in 1796 when Washington decided to step down after two terms. Many believed Alexander Hamilton would engage with Thomas Jefferson for the presidency but the elder statesmen (and Order of Freedom Member) John Adams was the Federalist’s main candidate. Thomas Jefferson, as expected, was the Democratic-Republican candidate. The election was close and the two sides split down the middle on everything from agriculture vs. manufacturing to France vs. Britain. In the end Adams carried the day winning the North and Caribbean (which begrudgingly voted Federalist due to their support of good trade relations with the French Caribbean and Britain) while Jefferson took the Agrarian south and French Quebec.



The Presidential Election of 1796, John Adams became the second president with 111 electoral votes to Thomas Jefferson’s 81

The biggest issue of Adam’s presidency was British and French harassment of American shipping. Congress and Washington had done much to keep the US Navy in good condition but it had had to hand over many of the captured British ships after the Revolutionary War which left it much weaker than the Royal Navy and the French Navy and thus unable to protect the vast bulk of American shipping.

To negotiate an agreement with France to stop Naval Harassment and bring relations to back due to their decline after the Jay Treaty, Adams sent three delegates to the new French Republic to establish better relations with the revolutionary government and stop the harassment. However the delegates were not even allowed to see the necessary officials unless the paid a large bribe and authorized a loan for France’s wars. The delegates left and the event, dubbed the XYZ Affair took the new nation by storm and lead to an outbreak of anti-French sentiment, even in Quebec which was quickly becoming intolerant of the French “brothers” ways in this revolution. When naval harassment continued, the federalists led the war cry much to the delight of the Order of Freedom. In late 1797 Congress shocked the world and declared war on France.
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Chapter 11.5
The First War



The First War
Why the United States went to War with France


By Matthew Davis

Barely ten years after throwing off the yoke of the British the infant United States went to war with what is considered to be the second most powerful nation on Earth at the time. Why? Did the nation have a collective death wish? Was the occasional harassment of a merchant ship worth the possible destruction of the entire nation?

The answer is simpler than many believe. The founding fathers, still very much in charge of the nation at the time, understood that France was in no position to wage a cross Atlantic war. French colonies were ripe for the picking to the south and goodwill could be gained from the British who were still a very real threat. The economic boost a war would provide only sweetened things. To those who understood just what was going on, the war was a deal not a gamble.

And indeed that is just what happened. Tied up in Italy, Egypt, Germany, Holland, Switzerland, and France herself she was in no position to send massive armies on some distant romantic expedition to North America much less maintain supply routes and all the logistics necessary. Her navies were also tied up maintaining routes in the Mediterranean and English Channel and battling, unsuccessfully, the Royal Navy. The fact that the Haitian revolt had not been crushed is a testament to that. In fact since the Bastille fell the French Caribbean had largely been on its own. Its population was closer to New York City than to Paris by this point (at least economically) and its garrisons were undermanned and under-equipped. The United States was now the major player in the Caribbean; it only made sense for her to strike.

The biggest reason though was the United States collective mentality of destiny. Americans had united the corners of the British Empire under liberty and freedom, now it was time to spread those values outward and where better to start than another great power? Indeed many historians consider the idea of Manifest Destiny, that idea that the United States is destined to expand its ideals and values outward in all direction, to be founded in this war.

In the end the war only made sense, it unified and expanded the nation, gained the US political capital with the old world, especially Britain, helped the economy to boom in relative safety, proved to the world it would not be bullied, and forced the world to take her and her values very seriously.



Dr. Matthew Davis is a historian at the University of Chicago. He graduated with his bachelors from the University of Illinois-Champagne then achieved his masters at Cornell. In addition to the University of Chicago he has worked with Ontario State and the University of Peru. Davis is a preeminent writer for the American Revolutionary period.
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Chapter 12
The Franco-American War


At first France was shocked that the Americans had declared war on them, it had been after all only little more than a decade since the French had come to their aid! Now this small nation saw itself fit to play with Europe’s big dogs?!

America however was underestimated again. American militia forces from Nova Scotia took St. Pierre and Miquelon without a fight, officially ending the French presence in Canada. In the Caribbean Commodore Briggs took the various navy ships stationed there and created a relatively powerful fleet. With it and the new Marines he took the French islands of Martinique and Guadeloupe. After a short sail down to French Guiana which surrendered its small Cayenne garrison after a day’s siege it was time to move to Haiti.

After easily taking out a small French fleet off Tortuga to secure the Haitian waters, Briggs’ Fleet, the Marines, and several Caribbean militias landed outside of Port-Au-Prince and saw their first real combat of the war. General Richard Fordham, the consensus leader of the land forces from Jamaica, realized the great fort of Port-Au-Prince would not fall as easily as the smaller French Islands. Because of this he made the bold strategy of allying himself with the Haitian Revolutionaries under Toussaint L’Ouveture who were being frustrated by the French. Fordham promised the Haitians immediate statehood and guaranteed their freedom from slavery in exchange for their help. The Haitians had hoped for complete independence but they begrudgingly agreed as their war had been ongoing since 1791 and many had died.

On December 18, 1798 the Haitians and Americans stormed Port-au-Prince and captured the city for the United States. The island would be secure by the end of January 1799, in the meantime Briggs returned to the Lesser Antilles in anticipation of a French naval counterattack. On March 5, 1799 a French fleet arrived and engaged the Americans off Guadeloupe.

After a day of intense ship to ship combat (and more Briggs “Ghost of Drake” sightings) the Americans emerged victorious in what many consider one of the United States’ most crucial naval victories and one of the biggest upsets in naval warfare history.

At home, the war was followed with much fervor. Unlike the last one this was a distant war of navies and marines, no more brothers killing brothers and battle outside the door. Still the effects could be felt at home. The sudden war gave Adams cause to create some highly controversial and political laws aimed largely at the Republicans who had backed France. The Alien and Sedition acts which made is very hard for an immigrant to become naturalized, allowed the president to deport anyone, and forbade people from publicly attacking the federal government was very unpopular. While the government stated these laws were aimed at the French for national security, it was widely believed they were aimed at the Republicans who had backed the French. Many consider these laws to be the reason the Federalists failed to capitalize on the war’s military and economic successes and gain dominance over the Democratic-Republicans.

After the fall of its new world colonies France, already distracted by war at home, put America on the side, refusing to negotiate either out of apathy or distraction. Some battles on the high seas persisted and privateering occurred by both sides but neither made a large move, until the Americans got frustrated and demanded France’s attention. At this time the American opened a smaller operational but tactically huge theater in the war, pressed onward by Adams and other Order of Freedom members. Contingents of Marines landed at various principalities and nations controlled or protected by the French in India with the promise of getting them independence.

The battle for India took the French garrison’s (and the world for that matter) completely by surprise. Already undersupplied and depleted from the revolution in France itself, the garrisons were no match for determined American marines and Indian freedom fighters. The Marines captured Mahe alongside their Indian allies with little resistance. And at Yanam the Americans and Indians captured the city and sank the French Indian Ocean fleet in port. The only French victory came at Pondicherry where US ships full of Marines and supplies were sunk by a storm resulting in a mass US surrender on the beaches. With the year however the Marines and the city would be free of the French.

Elsewhere the French were reeling on other fronts. Napoleon, despite all his military brilliance, was faltering in Egypt against repeated uprisings, Ottoman attacks, and British interference. On the continent, the war of the second coalition was not going well for France with defeats in Germany and Italy. Fearful that the Americans would join the Second Coalition (a small band of voluntary soldiers from Virginia known as the “Virginia Brigade” had gained wide acclaim and popularity at home and abroad from their work against the French in the Batavian Republic) and looking to maybe earn some much needed cash for their lost colonies, the French went to the negotiating table.

On September 17, 1799 the Treaty of Madrid ended the Franco-American War with the US purchasing French possessions in the Western Hemisphere and the Indian kingdoms and Haiti gaining their independence. Ironically the last battle of the war came a week after the treaty was signed off the coast of Florida where the USS Nova Scotia was sunk by the French frigate Bonne. Regardless the United States was 2-0 against the greatest powers of the world.

Map of Franco-American War Battles
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Chapter 12.5
The Last Battles of an Era

Captain Samuel Greene was all over the wheel of his ship, the frigate USS Hammer, doing everything in his power to keep the ship zigging and zagging around incoming French cannonballs. Guadeloupe had been a walk in the park for the veteran captain; Martinique however was proving to be something completely different.

The Hammer was fast approaching a French brigantine, but luckily across the water on the other side of the enemy ship was another navy vessel, the USS New Hampshire. Greene had a crewman signal the New Hampshire to take the enemies port side while he would sail up on her starboard. The French ship didn’t stand a chance. Stuck in the middle of two American ships, they blasted the French ship until she was little more than a burning sinking hulk in their wake. That small victory however would mean nothing if they couldn’t get a good shot at the French fort.

The two American ships continued their staggered sail as they got ever closer to the French fortress. The captains then made their move. Greene cut hard to port while the New Hampshire cut hard to starboard. The two ships barely missed each other but their broadsides now faced the fort and unleashed their fury upon it. Brick and mortar exploded from the fort but still the mighty fortress stood, no matter what they did the Americans couldn’t hit the decisive shot and until the fort fell, they could not risk landing Marines.

As Greene turned his ship around to regroup amongst the rest of the American fleet, he was surprised to see the USS Freedom, a 98 gun ship of the line, right off his port side. The Freedom was taking some hits but her guns were loaded and she was braking to port. After the maneuver revealed the fort to her broadside her sailors unleashed their fury upon it once again sending brick and men flying through the air. 98 direct hits coupled with the attack the Hammer and New Hampshire had just done crippled the fort but the Freedom was not done yet. She pulled in a circle revealing her other broadside and unleashed another volley onto the fort, breaking the fortress for good.

Greene noticed several ships in the waiting fleet releasing their sails; these transports carried entire contingents of marines with which Martinique itself would be taken.

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Quincy Garza’s family had come to the Americas long ago from Spain. They had settled in Jamaica but when that island became English the family found themselves in a peculiar situation. While many Spanish left, they decided to stay. They learned English and even began to name themselves like English, retaining only the last name Garza as a tribute to their ancestors and heritage.

Now Jamaica was an American state and the Garza family had to adapt again. Quincy was a young boy at the start of the revolution and made up his mind that if the country gained it’s independence he would enlist in the military when he came of age. In 1797 at the age of 18 he became a Jamaican militiaman and now, a year later, he was about to taste combat.

He and his unit were running through the jungles of Haiti, towards Port-au-Prince. In front of him was rising smoke and the sound of cannon blasts as the city battled the American fleet. To his right was the thickest jungle he had ever seen and to his left, past his fellow soldiers were Creole Haitian rebels. The jungle tree line was in front of the soldiers, he made sure everything was ready because it was time for battle. The soldiers erupted through the tree line into an open field of crops and the occasional house. They got about half way to the city walls before the French defenders noticed them and began to open fire. Garza returned fire but had trouble reloading while running; thankfully he reached the denser part of Port-au-Prince that fell outside the city walls in one piece.

Hiding behind some crates he reloaded his musket and attached his bayonet. His captain then rallied his men towards a spot down the wall where the navy had made a breach. Garza, the Americans, and the Haitians sprinted through and emerged in the middle of a fire fight. Cannon blasts exploded around him and bullets were flying everywhere. Garza fired his weapon towards a mass of men, he was pretty sure they were French but in this chaos who knew.

The world was awash in smoke, fire, and thunder as Garza tried to get a sense of things. He kept having to fend off French soldiers with his rifle however so he could never get a good bearing on his situation. He felt a hot sting in his shoulder and noticed blood, he had been hit. Garza decided it was time to get out of the chaos, he ran to a low lying stone wall in front of a store and took cover. It wasn’t quiet but it was safe for instead of bullets and blasts encircling him, there was only wet rocks and grass from the morning dew.

Garza took a few minutes to catch his breath and tie a piece of cloth around his shoulder, the wound wasn’t bad but it was still there. Garza reloaded his rifle and began to pick off enemy soldiers from a safe distance. He would do this for the next hour as the Americans and Haitians slowly took the city.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sgt. Thomas Howell came from a military family. His grandpa was a British captain during the French and Indian War and his father had fought for the Continental Army during the revolution. Now the young Pennsylvanian was about to write his own military chapter, albeit on a battlefield much farther from home, Mahe India.

After the seizure of French territory earlier in the war in North America and after France’s continued persistence at continuing the war and prolonging negotiations, Congress had voted to send a fleet and several units of Marines to the French Indian colonies to incite rebellion and open a new theater. It was a bold strategy but a necessary one. France was a mess and needed a strong reason to negotiate reasonably and America needed to end the war soon while it was still favorable and before the French sent a young general named Napoleon who was proving quite capable on the battlefield to a more important war than in Egypt.

Howell and his unit had landed at a town called Raypur just a few miles south of Mahe, their intention was to reach the French colony at night and begin the battle from the inside. Local Indian resistance leaders should already be in place to assist less the more numerous French garrison overwhelm the Americans.

The marines quietly made their way through the vegetation of the strange sub-continent and reached the city walls that had been built just fifty years earlier by the French Indian Company. The marines made their way quietly along the base of the walls until they reached a marked passage underneath the walls that had been dug by the resistance.

Once in the city the marines quickly split up into small teams and made their way to their strategic positions. After an hour of getting into place the town clock struck two in the morning and shots began to go off as placed marines and fighters took out guards and sentries. The alarm was raised in the French fort but explosions followed as their weapons stores that had not been captured were destroyed. The rest of the night was a mishmash of fighting between un-captured French soldiers and the Americans and Indians. By dawn, Mahe was taken and the world had just changed forever.
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